Article Library
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

Chapter 7 BK Statement of Intention to Surrender — What about a Change of Mind?

Posted By USFN, Thursday, April 9, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

April 9, 2015 

 

by Charles Pullium and Tom Holmes
Millsap & Singer, LLC – USFN Member (Missouri)

When a debtor files a chapter 7 petition, bankruptcy law requires that the debtor state his intention to surrender, reaffirm, or redeem property in which a creditor has a secured interest. This statement of intention must be filed within 30 days of the filing of the bankruptcy petition, or on or before the date of the meeting of creditors, whichever is earlier. Bankruptcy law also provides that the debtor must perform his intention within 30 days from the first date set for the meeting of creditors. 11 U.S.C. § 521.

So, what happens if the debtor expresses his intention to surrender a property in his statement of intention, but changes his mind at a later date? Unless the debtor sought and received an extension of time to amend the statement, he may be stuck. A bankruptcy court in Florida recently held this to be the case. See In re Failla, S.D. Florida, 11-34324. In that case the debtors, who defaulted on their note and mortgage, filed a chapter 7 bankruptcy petition along with their statement of intention in which they declared their intention to surrender the property. The debtors’ schedules properly listed the property and the secured lien, and the debtors did not dispute the debt. The debtors then sought to amend their statement of intention to declare an intention to reaffirm the debt. However, the amendment was untimely and did not result in a valid amendment of the original statement.

Four months after the filing of the bankruptcy petition, the debtors received their discharge. When the mortgage creditor resumed foreclosure activity, the debtors actively opposed the action in the state court. The mortgage creditor then went back to the bankruptcy court and sought an order from the court compelling the debtors to surrender the property pursuant to the statement of intention. The bankruptcy court found the creditor’s argument to be persuasive and ordered the debtors to surrender the property. In doing so, the court posed and answered a number of interesting questions.

First, what must a debtor do, or not do, to perform his intention to surrender? There are generally two views: (1) the debtor must take affirmative action to actually turn over the property; or, (2) which is the more common opinion, the debtor cannot take action to impede the lawful course that would normally be pursued in state court by a secured creditor. This is to say that a debtor may not actively defend or contest a foreclosure in a state court if the debtor previously admitted the validity of the debt and stated an intention to surrender the property in a bankruptcy case that resulted in the debtor’s discharge.

Second, to whom must the debtor surrender the property? The debtors in the Failla case cite a single case in support of their position that the property should be surrendered to the bankruptcy trustee. In re Kasper, 309 B.R. 82, 85-86 (Bankr. D.D.C. 2004). The debtors contend that they did surrender the property to the trustee, who then abandoned the property as an asset of the estate, thereby reverting the property interest back to the debtors upon the trustee’s abandonment.

However, the majority opinion, and the one that the court takes in the Failla case, is that the property must be surrendered to the secured lienholder. The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals stated that, “Allowing a debtor to retain property without reaffirming or redeeming gives the debtor not a “fresh start” but a “head start” since the debtor effectively converts his secured obligation from recourse to nonrecourse with no downside risk for failing to maintain or insure the lender’s collateral. Section 521 mandates that a debtor who intends to retain secured property must specify an intention to redeem or reaffirm.” In re Taylor, 3 F.3d at 1516.

A debtor, who persists in his refusal to surrender the property by actively defending a foreclosure suit in this type of situation, may be putting his discharge in jeopardy or, as the Failla case suggests, committing fraud. The refusal to surrender also constitutes a violation of 11 U.S.C. § 521(a)(2), which requires a debtor to perform his intention with respect to such property within 30 days after the meeting of creditors.

The relevance of a debtor’s past bankruptcy case cannot be overlooked when litigating a foreclosure or other subsequent, related matter. A debtor may be precluded from taking inconsistent positions in related matters and may be bound to perform a prior intention.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
April e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Wisconsin: Increase in Mediation Fees

Posted By USFN, Thursday, April 9, 2015
Updated: Thursday, September 24, 2015

April 9, 2015 

 

by Patricia Lonzo
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. – USFN Member (Wisconsin)

Ten counties in Wisconsin are implementing a substantial increase in the mediation fee that is charged by the foreclosure mediation programs. There is a Notice of Availability of Mediation form that is currently required to be served with the Summons and Complaint, informing borrowers of their right to request mediation. The form has been updated by the mediation programs to reflect the change and must be used as of April 1, 2015.

The pre-April 1 mediation fee for the relevant counties is $150 for both the borrower and servicer to participate in mediation. The mediation fee charged by the mediation programs for applications submitted by borrowers effective April 1, 2015 is $400 for the borrower and $600 for the servicer. The ten counties implementing the increased mediation fee are Milwaukee, Waukesha, Kenosha, Racine, Dane, Dodge, Marathon, Portage, Sauk, and Wood. Participation in the mediation program by the servicer is voluntary, except in the counties of Kenosha and Racine. If the borrower requests mediation in Kenosha or Racine, the servicer is required to participate.

Mediation programs in Wisconsin are established and governed on a county level; therefore, this change only impacts the identified counties.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
April e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Washington: Foreclosure Mediation — Looking Back and Looking Forward

Posted By USFN, Thursday, April 9, 2015
Updated: Thursday, September 24, 2015

April 9, 2015 

 

by Susana Chambers (Davila)
RCO Legal, P.S.
USFN Member (Arkansas, Oregon, Washington)

Washington’s Foreclosure Fairness Act (FFA) was enacted in 2011 as an amendment to the Washington Deed of Trust Act, RCW § 61.24, the statutory guidance for nonjudicial foreclosure in Washington State. The FFA established a foreclosure mediation program (Mediation Program), which is administered by Washington’s Department of Commerce (Commerce). Commerce reports annually to the legislature on the performance and results of the Mediation Program.

Looking Back – Best Practices Established
Over the last three years, foreclosure mediation “best practices” have emerged as a result of more than 6,300 mediation referrals in the state. Beneficiaries with organized mediation groups who regularly employ these best practices generally experience success in the Mediation Program.

By now, most beneficiaries have successfully adapted to the Washington foreclosure mediation program, and the beneficiaries’ attorneys often find that the bank mediation representative on the phone is familiar with the mediation process in Washington. However, avoidable delays still occur, resulting in additional mediation sessions and unnecessarily elongating foreclosure timelines. To avoid these delays and the inevitable expense of additional attorneys’ fees and mediation costs associated with them, beneficiaries should consider the following best practice suggestions:


  • Assign the same underwriter for the loss mitigation review who will also be available to attend the mediation session. This continuity provides stability to the mediation process and is consistent with federal rules regarding a specific point of contact.
  • Beneficiary representatives participating in mediation should be familiar with the loan investor’s guidelines and be prepared to explain, in detail, the reason for a denial for modification, or other loss mitigation option. It was the legislature’s intent that the foreclosure mediation provide transparency for the borrower; this includes clearly explaining any denial for loss mitigation options and providing the applicable investor guidelines to the mediation parties.
  • Beneficiaries should promptly review borrower applications for loss mitigation upon receipt and stay in close contact with their attorney’s office about incomplete documentation, so that the financial package does not become stale-dated. Consistent with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Regulation X, beneficiaries should already be notifying the borrower (within five business days of receipt of their financial package) of any missing information needed to complete the financial package. (12 CFR § 1024.41.)
  • During the mediation session, beneficiaries should request a private caucus with their attorney if they are unsure of how to respond to a legal question during the mediation session.

 

Beneficiaries who utilize these suggested practices generally experience more success in the Mediation Program, such as: fewer mediation sessions, shortened foreclosure timelines, less risk of a “bad faith” finding from the mediator, and reduced likelihood of litigation.

Looking Back – Commerce’s Annual Report
In October 2014, Commerce published its third annual report to the legislature on the status and progress of the Mediation Program. Commerce reported that from July 2011 through June 2014, it had received 6,319 referrals to mediation. Of the mediation referrals, Commerce deemed 88 percent of them eligible for mediation, and they were then assigned to one of the 126 approved foreclosure mediators in the state.

Now that the Mediation Program has been in existence in Washington for nearly four years, the results of the program have become clear; of the 4,059 mediated cases reported by Commerce:

  • 883 resulted in agreements where the borrowers stayed in their homes through modification of the loan, repayment of the arrears, or reinstatement of the loan;
  • 248 resulted in agreements where the borrowers did not keep their homes — such as a pre-foreclosure sale, deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, or cash for keys;
  • 1,359 mediations resulted in no agreement between the parties; and
  • 1,569 did not occur. The majority of these mediation cases were closed because an agreement was reached between the parties before the mediation occurred — primarily, the borrower was offered, and accepted, a loan modification.

Borrowers were found to have mediated “not in good faith” more often than a beneficiary. Commerce reported that there were 362 cases where the borrower did not mediate in good faith, and 199 cases where the beneficiary did not mediate in good faith.

The failure of a beneficiary to mediate in good faith constitutes a defense to the nonjudicial foreclosure action and may be a violation of the Consumer Protection Act, RCW § 19.86. A borrower's failure simply allows the beneficiary to move forward with the nonjudicial foreclosure, but does not result in any other legal consequence to the borrower.

Looking Forward – The Foreclosure Fairness Fund
For each Notice of Default issued on owner-occupied residential real property in Washington, the beneficiary is required to pay a $250 fee into the Foreclosure Fairness Fund (Fund). This is commonly referred to as a “foreclosure tax.” The money deposited into the Fund is allocated amongst several groups as provided by RCW § 61.24.172:

  • 71%: Housing Finance Commission — goes to Homeowner Counseling.
  • 18%: Department of Commerce — goes to Program Implementation and Administration.
  • 6%: Office of the Attorney General — goes to Consumer Protection.
  • 3%: Department of Financial Institutions — goes to Education and Outreach.
  • 2% Office of Civil Legal Aid — goes to Homeowner Legal Representation.

As of June 30, 2014, a total of $15,908,275 had been deposited into the Fund. The highest amount of quarterly deposits into the Fund was during the second quarter of 2013, a total of $2,097,750. Since then, deposits into the Fund have dramatically dropped. For the second quarter of 2014, the total deposits were $916,500, less than half of the deposits reported in that same quarter, the year before. As the funding of the Mediation Program continues to drop, the public resources available to support the program will also decrease.

Looking Forward – Exemption from the Mediation Program.

Besides the decreasing budget of the Fund, RCW § 61.24.174, provides some beneficiaries an exemption from the foreclosure tax if they certify that they are FDIC-insured institutions, and that they issued less than 250 notices of default in the preceding year. As of January 31, 2015, over 200 beneficiaries appeared on the exemption list — nearly double the number exempted from mediation in 2011. As foreclosures are anticipated to continue declining, more beneficiaries will become eligible to be exempted from mediation, further shrinking the number of beneficiaries participating in the foreclosure mediation program, and further reducing the foreclosure tax paid to Commerce.

Conclusion
The FFA, amended three times since its implementation in 2011, does not include a sunset date for the Mediation Program. As foreclosures continue to decline throughout the nation, the long-term viability of the Mediation Program in Washington remains questionable for fiscal and practical reasons.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
April e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Wisconsin Supreme Court Interprets Statute regarding Abandoned Properties in Foreclosure

Posted By USFN, Monday, March 9, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 9, 2015 

 

by William (Nick) Foshag
Gray & Associates, L.L.P – USFN Member (Wisconsin)

The foreclosure process in this state, after judgment but before sale, has traditionally been driven by the foreclosing lender. The Wisconsin Supreme Court’s recent interpretation of Wis. Stat. § 846.102, however, appears to put the debtor, other parties, or a municipality in the driver’s seat as well — at least in relation to abandoned properties. [The Bank of New York Mellon v. Carson, 2015 WI 15 (Feb. 17, 2015)]. In Carson, the Supreme Court found that when a finding of abandonment is made in a foreclosure action, a circuit court may order the foreclosing lender to schedule a sheriff’s sale, and that it may determine the reasonable time after the redemption period in which the sale must be held.

In the case, the foreclosing lender had obtained a default judgment with a waiver of any deficiency. Later, the borrower filed a motion asking that the judgment be amended to indicate that the property was abandoned, and to order the lender to schedule a sheriff’s sale. The circuit court refused, and the borrower appealed.

The Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court interpreted § 846.102(2) to allow any party to the case, or a municipality, to support a request for finding the property to be abandoned; and, if abandoned, that the inclusion of the word “shall” within § 846.102(1) mandates that the lender schedule a sheriff’s sale.

Impact of the Carson Decision
 This ruling affects ALL properties in foreclosure. Foreclosing lenders should regularly inspect all properties in foreclosure (every 30 days) throughout the entire foreclosure process, and regularly communicate the results of these inspections to foreclosure counsel so that appropriate action can be taken.

• Prior to obtaining judgment, foreclosing lenders should determine whether the value and overall condition of the property is such that it is in the lender’s best interests to continue. Once a judgment has been entered, depending on the circumstances, it may be very difficult — if not impossible — to vacate the foreclosure judgment.

• After obtaining judgment, if a property that was previously occupied is found to have become abandoned, the lender should determine whether the value and overall condition of the property is such that it is in the lender’s best interests to attempt to either: amend the judgment to allow for a sheriff’s sale to be held sooner, or to attempt to vacate the judgment and/or dismiss the action.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Missouri: Removing Motor Vehicles after Foreclosure

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Benjamin C. Struby
Millsap & Singer, LLC – USFN Member (Missouri)

Pick a scenario: You have just obtained title to a property through foreclosure and your property preservation company has reported back to you that the property is vacant, save a motorcycle in the driveway; or, the former owner of the property that is boarded in your REO inventory used a barn on the acreage as a boat repair shop and, in his haste to vacate, left two boats on the land; or, your local real estate agent visited a newly acquired property to deliver a cash-for-keys offer, only to find the property vacant of people and personal property, except that a car is parked in the front yard.

If you work with post-foreclosure properties, whether in an REO department or on a conveyance team, chances are that you have been faced with one of the above scenarios — or at least something similar. What can be done to remove the car/boat/motorcycle (or any other kind of motor vehicle) from the property? To start, be resigned to the fact that you may need to have an eviction performed. Missouri, like many other states, is considered a “must-evict” state, where an eviction should be performed if personal property remains after foreclosure.

It certainly can be a frustrating proposition to have to wait on the eviction process to run its course, so it is best to explore other avenues that might allow you to bypass a full eviction. If the agent can locate the former occupant, a simple visit to the new residence to encourage voluntary removal will often suffice. If the former occupant cannot be located, or can be found but refuses to remove the vehicle, then you may be able to go another route: contact the local sheriff’s department.

Missouri Statute Section 304.157 provides that a motor vehicle (defined as “motor vehicle, trailer, all-terrain vehicle, outboard motor or vessel”) that is abandoned on private property may be removed by the sheriff’s department. Accordingly, if all that remains at the property is a motor vehicle, instruct your local agent to make contact with the sheriff’s department to inquire into these services. By doing so, perhaps you can avoid the sometimes-lengthy eviction process.

Unfortunately, the above-referenced statute does not guarantee that the authorities will remove the vehicle, as the statute uses “may” remove instead of “shall” remove, thus making the removal a discretionary act of the sheriff’s department. In practice, you will find that some counties will agree to remove the vehicle under the authorization that the statues provide, while others respond that an eviction must be completed.

If the sheriff’s department declines your request to remove the vehicle, then fall back to an actual eviction suit. From a timeline standpoint, the eviction action should be started right away to ensure that no time is lost while the sheriff’s department is contacted. After judgment and at lockout, any motor vehicle can be towed and left at the nearest public road for removal by the sheriff’s department under Missouri Statute Section 304.155.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Missouri: Mobile Homes — Conversion to Real Property

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Michael D. Holman
Millsap & Singer, LLC – USFN Member (Missouri)

In March 2011, Missouri adopted new statutory provisions regarding affixation of mobile homes and their conversion from personal property to real property. The new rules create a rigorous process by which the owner of a mobile home, and the real estate on which the home sits, manifests his intent that the mobile home (once personal property) be given the vaunted status of real property, like a traditional site-built home. The process, while not without its own shortcomings and fresh challenges, has served to remove some ambiguity and risk, and has given definition to what was once a process based on observation and interpretation.

Previously, all that was required was that the home be permanently attached to the land and that there was unity of ownership between the home and real property. At best, the public record might have reflected a rider/addendum to a deed of trust where the borrower pledged the mobile home as additional collateral, and attested that it was — or would be — permanently attached to the land. Not only was there room for interpretation as to what qualified as “permanently attached,” there was no guarantee that a borrower would ever follow through and take steps to affix the mobile home.

Though movement of a mobile home under any circumstances is no small feat, lenders looked for the home to be embedded in a permanent concrete foundation or strapped to piers instead of merely resting on cinderblocks, waiting for the wheels to be re-mounted and the mobile home towed away. For the underwriters, the risk of the mobile home being removed in the dead of night left them feeling vulnerable, so they did what they could to mitigate the risk of loss. They were also faced with the risk that liens may have attached to the personal property, which would not be readily apparent in the same way that liens against real property might be, especially when the certificate of title for an “affixed’ mobile home might be misplaced under the mistaken belief that it was no longer relevant or valid.

In contrast, the current statute requires that documents be filed in the public record under penalty of perjury, both with the Recorder of Deeds for the county where the property is located and with the Department of Revenue’s Motor Vehicle Bureau. The two primary forms used during the affixation and conversion process are the Form 5312 “Affidavit of Affixation,” and the Form 5314 “Application for Confirmation of Conversion,” both of which are ultimately submitted to the Department of Revenue before their records are updated to reflect that the mobile home has lost its motor vehicle title and has gained an “affixation title.” The Affidavit of Affixation speaks to the physical attachment of the property, and the Application for Confirmation of Conversion swears to the quality of title. These are two issues that are essential to the affixation and conversion analysis, but which were not documented under the old statute. By making both of these documents available to the public, there should be no question as to whether a mobile home is treated as part of the real property in Missouri.

Despite statutory language to the contrary “grandfathering” manufactured homes deemed affixed prior to 2011, Missouri underwriters have taken the position that no ALTA-7 endorsements will be issued unless the current statutory affixation and conversion process has been completed. It becomes the subsequent owner’s responsibility to ensure that the new requirements are met. For a foreclosing lender, this can add between three to six months before a property is ready to market out of REO once the foreclosure sale is completed. When conveyance to HUD or the VA is contemplated, the existence of an uninsurable manufactured home creates a “title issue” that may prevent a clear owner’s policy and substantially delay completion of the process.

Beyond the timeline implications, a lender is required to make certain sworn statements to be recorded with the Recorder of Deeds and filed with the Missouri Department of Revenue; namely, that: (1) the manufactured home is, or shall be, permanently affixed to the real estate; (2) the home has the characteristics of site-built housing and is part of the land; (3) the home was built in compliance with the federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards Act; and (4) the home is, or shall be, assessed and taxed as an improvement to the land. The lender must further affirm under the penalty of perjury that the information contained in the Application for Confirmation of Conversion (Form 5314) is true and accurate as pertains to the certificate of title and the existence (or nonexistence) of additional security interests/liens against the manufactured home.

These sworn statements cannot be taken lightly, nor can the documents be signed as a matter of form. Given the gravity of the required statements, one option to limit exposure is to file a suit for replevin and declaratory judgment to affirm title to the manufactured home and obtain judgment stating that the mobile home is to be treated as affixed, prior to completing the statutory affixation and conversion process. Another is to request a detailed property inspection post-foreclosure sale for the purpose of gathering all necessary information about the manufactured home and to confirm affixation that would meet HUD requirements. Where doubt remains as to how “affixed” a particular manufactured home is, an engineer’s report from a licensed structural engineer can be requested to supplement information previously gathered from site inspections, appraisals, or other information gleaned from the loan file.

As we get further from the statute’s effective date, it is anticipated that new manufactured homes will be properly affixed at origination/initial placement and duly converted under the current rules, and that only pre-2011 manufactured homes will require additional corrective action to clarify title to the manufactured home. Until then, it is necessary that all involved parties continue to work together closely to address the special issues whenever a manufactured home is added to the mix.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Managing Timelines in the Oregon Foreclosure Avoidance Program

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Erik Wilson
RCO Legal, P.S. – USFN Member (Arkansas, Oregon, Washington)

Since August 4, 2013, the Oregon Foreclosure Avoidance Program requires certain beneficiaries to engage in mediation with grantors prior to filing judicial and nonjudicial foreclosures. For background on this program, see “Mediation Updates from Four States: [including] Oregon,” USFN Report (summer 2013 ed.).

The mediation program extends the overall foreclosure timeline that a beneficiary faces when foreclosing a residential trust deed in Oregon. When a beneficiary, or its servicing agent, initiates a pre-foreclosure mediation, the waiting begins. Mediation Case Manager (MCM) can set a first conference date up to 85 days out from the date that the beneficiary begins the process. In MCM’s report to the Oregon Foreclosure Avoidance Program Advisory Committee, it is noted that “initial sessions rarely occur on the notice date” [MCM Advisory Committee Report delivered June 26, 2014]. MCM reports that 62 percent of cases met at least two times, with 24 percent meeting more than two times. The program allows the neutral facilitator to schedule a subsequent session over a party’s objection one time. Any further subsequent sessions must be set by mutual agreement of the parties. With an average of 60 days between sessions, this adds a substantial delay to a beneficiary or servicer filing a foreclosure action.

Beneficiaries are required to provide “… a description of any additional documents the beneficiary requires to evaluate the grantor’s eligibility for a foreclosure avoidance measure …” [ORS 86.729(4)(b)(H)]. However, document issues remain the primary cause of delay. [MCM Advisory Committee Report delivered June 26, 2014].

Very often, grantors will attend a first resolution conference without having provided a complete loss mitigation application to the beneficiary. This can turn the first conference into a document collection and coordination session, rather than a discussion about options available to cure the default. Reaching out to the grantor through its housing counselor, or attorney, to identify the missing and necessary documents is a good first step to shorten the timeline and reach resolution. To this end, good working relationships among the repeat players have been key in resolving document issues in advance of first conferences, and lead to more substantive and meaningful discussion of foreclosure alternatives during the session. The other way that beneficiaries can combat delay is to withhold consent from scheduling subsequent conferences. This limits the number to two conferences, unless all parties agree to another. Restricting the number of conferences in this manner has resulted in more grantors coming to the table with complete packages at the first meeting.

Beneficiaries and servicers are naturally sensitive to increased delays in the already-lengthy Oregon foreclosure process. By taking proactive steps to prevent delays and providing borrowers with clear instructions when notifying them of missing or incomplete loss mitigation applications, timelines to resolve the default or begin foreclosure can be shortened considerably.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Guidelines for Effective File Transfers: USFN White Paper

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Alberta Hultman, USFN Executive Director & CEO

USFN is pleased to announce the availability of a new white paper, “Guidelines for Effective File Transfers,” which was developed over the last eight months by members of USFN, select clients, and advisors. The document is in a “scenario planning” format, outlining the steps that may be taken — given the circumstances of a particular event — when a transfer of files is made.

The scenarios include: servicer to servicer, law firm to law firm, a combination of these, or when a servicer or firm closes shop. Its intent is to provide sensible guidance for affected parties, while allowing for a company or firm to adapt the Guidelines to its own internal process.

The Guidelines can be found at:
http://www.usfn.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Home&Template=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentFileID=8206.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Fast-Track Legislation Resource Center

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Wendy Anderson, Esq.
Safeguard Properties Management, LLC – USFN Associate Member

Safeguard Properties recently introduced a Fast-Track Legislation Resource Center to monitor state-by-state legislation related to expediting foreclosure procedures for vacant and abandoned properties that are languishing in the process, exposing those homes to additional risks. The easy-to-navigate, interactive map tool provides industry professionals with a resource to stay abreast of the latest fast-track legislation, along with links to applicable media coverage.

Fast-track legislation has the potential to help rebuild communities by establishing a standard definition for an abandoned property in each state, as Illinois and New Jersey did when they enacted foreclosure fast-track laws in the past two years. Determining proper candidates for expedited foreclosure is a critical component to fast-track legislation and addresses one of the biggest challenges that the mortgage industry faces when properties go into default: which of the approximately 18 million vacant properties in the U.S. are “abandoned”? The ability to more clearly identify abandoned properties can offer important guidance, as well as help to mitigate risk for the mortgage industry and their field service partners, tasked with protecting and maintaining those properties as they proceed through foreclosure.

Because the process of rebuilding can only start after an abandoned property moves through foreclosure and into new hands, accelerating the process offers lawmakers and business leaders an effective means to ultimately revitalize struggling neighborhoods, stem blight, stop the out-migration of residents, and uphold property values.

For assistance in staying on top of recent developments in fast-track legislation, explore the new Fast-Track Legislation Resource Center. Further, as a starting point for state legislators and policy makers, the Mortgage Bankers Association’s Vacant and Abandoned Property Working Group and the New York MBA have compiled “Principles to Expedite the Foreclosure Process for Vacant and Abandoned Properties.” Additionally, the Ohio MBA version can be viewed here.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Connecticut: Appellate Court Reviews Standing to Foreclose

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Alex-John Ricciardone
Bendett & McHugh, P.C. – USFN Member (Connecticut, Maine, Vermont)

In a recent Connecticut Appellate Court opinion, the court addressed whether a mortgagor can challenge standing to foreclose a mortgage on appeal if the party failed to challenge it at trial. [Eastern Savings Bank v. Cortese, 2014 Conn. App. LEXIS 546]. The court concluded that a mortgagor who does not object or challenge a mortgagee’s introduction of an original, signed promissory note and mortgage into evidence at trial cannot raise the issue on appeal. Once a trial court accepts the mortgagee’s prime facie case and finds the mortgagee a holder of a note entitled to enforce it without objection and enters judgment, the issue is settled.

In Cortese, the plaintiff sought to foreclose two mortgages on real property that a defendant owned. The defendant filed an answer, special defenses, and a counterclaim that resulted in the matter going to a bench trial. At trial, the plaintiff proffered the original, signed promissory notes and mortgages into evidence to prove its prima facie case that it was the holder of the notes and entitled to enforce them. The defendant submitted no objection to the admission of evidence. At the conclusion of the trial, the court entered judgment for the plaintiff on the complaint and counterclaim.

During a post-trial hearing to determine the amount of debt, the defendant challenged subject matter jurisdiction on the grounds that the complaint did not contain an allegation that the plaintiff was the holder of the note, and thereby standing was lacking for the entry of the judgment of foreclosure. The plaintiff petitioned the court to allow it to file an amended complaint to include the allegation. The court rejected the defendant’s arguments, and allowed the plaintiff to amend its complaint to conform to the uncontested facts presented at trial.

On appeal, the defendant challenged the trial court’s subject matter jurisdiction and its discretion in allowing the plaintiff to amend its complaint. The appellate court quickly disposed of the subject matter challenge, and held that the trial court’s determination that the plaintiff was the holder of the note (based upon the plaintiff’s uncontested admission of evidence) was “not erroneous.” The court pointed out that, at trial, the defendant never objected to the admission of the evidence, nor challenged the prima facie evidence showing that the plaintiff was the note holder.

In addressing the defendant’s argument that the trial court abused its discretion, the appellate court reiterated that a trial court has discretion in allowing a plaintiff to amend its complaint after judgment. The court held that since it was clear that the plaintiff was foreclosing on the mortgages as the holder of notes, the amendment “did nothing more than conform the complaint to the proof adduced at trial.” There were no surprises to the defendant, nor was there any prejudice. The court then affirmed the trial court’s foreclosure judgment. This appellate judicial decision should help foreclosure plaintiffs in Connecticut combat dilatory pleadings challenging standing after judgment has already been entered in a case.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Connecticut: Appellate Court Reviews Foreclosure Sale Winning Bid

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker
Bendett & McHugh, P.C. – USFN Member (Connecticut, Maine, Vermont)

In a decision officially released on February 3, 2015, the Connecticut Appellate Court found that a trial court did not abuse its discretion when approving a foreclosure sale with a winning bid that was less than 43 percent of the appraised value. [National City Real Estate Services, LLC v. Tuttle, 155 Conn. App. 290 (2015)]. On appeal, the record showed that on January 22, 2013, a judgment of foreclosure by sale was entered. When entering judgment, the court found the property value was $490,000. At the auction on May 25, 2013, the opening bid was $157,639.63. There were forty-two bids made. The final winning bid was $210,500. The winning bid is only about 42.9 percent of the appraised value. On May 30, 2013, the committee filed a motion for approval of the sale. In an objection to that motion, the borrowers asserted that approval of the sale was inequitable. It appears that borrowers’ counsel was looking for the court to adopt a bright-line rule, which the court refused to do.

Prior to the trial court’s approval of the foreclosure sale, borrowers’ counsel had filed a written objection. The plaintiff filed a reply, citing to LaSalle Bank, N.A v. Randall, 125 Conn. App. 31 (2010). In LaSalle, the appellate court upheld a sale in which the winning bid was 40 percent of the appraised value, which is a larger difference than in the present case. Armed with the knowledge of this case law at a hearing on July 15, 2013, the trial court asked the borrowers’ counsel to distinguish the subject case facts from the facts in LaSalle. Borrowers’ counsel incorrectly answered that the disparity between the bid and the market value was larger in this case than in LaSalle. The appellate court pointed out that plaintiff’s counsel was able to correct that answer for the trial judge. This highlights the importance of the preparation for these types of hearings, including doing legal research and providing a memorandum for the court’s reference.

Also during oral argument on July 15, 2013, the trial judge asked, “what’s to say if there’s another sale that they’re going to get [a higher bid]?” In response, borrowers’ counsel stated that “that’s the chance that everybody’s going to take,” and then he returned to his argument that the final bid was well below fair market value.” National City Real Estate Services, LLC v. Tuttle, supra, 155 Conn. App. at 294. Thus, borrowers’ counsel had not provided any evidence, nor could he, that another sale would yield a different result. On November 15, 2013, the trial court granted the motion for approval of the sale over the borrowers’ objection.

The appellate court recognized that a trial court could, under certain circumstances, refuse to approve a sale. The appellate court cited to First National Bank of Chicago v. Maynard, 75 Conn. App. 355, 361; 815 A.2d 1244 (it is “generally recognized that the grounds [that] would warrant a court’s refusal to approve a [foreclosure] sale are fraud, misrepresentation, surprise or mistake” [internal quotation marks omitted]), cert. denied, 263 Conn. 914, 821 A.2d 768 (2003). In Tuttle, the borrowers could not argue that any of those grounds existed.

Further, the appellate court looked at the borrowers’ own actions. Specifically, the auction took place when it was raining heavily. Despite the heavy rain, the borrowers did not allow access to the property for either an inspection or to conduct the auction. On appeal, the court found that “it could fairly be argued that the defendants’ own actions may have contributed to a lower sale price.” National City Real Estate Services, LLC v. Tuttle, supra, 155 Conn. App. at 297.

This case demonstrates that unless there is a compelling reason, a servicer should not bid more than the debt merely because the property is valued much higher than the debt. In Connecticut, if a plaintiff does bid more than the debt, the difference must be deposited with the court for distribution to other lienholders or to the borrowers. Additionally, Tuttle shows the importance of doing extra work in certain circumstances, including providing a trial brief to assist the court.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Amendments to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of California Local Bankruptcy Rules and Forms

Posted By USFN, Friday, March 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

March 6, 2015 

 

by Megan E. Lees
Pite Duncan, LLP – USFN Member (California, Nevada)

Certain amendments to the Local Bankruptcy Rules (LBR) and local bankruptcy forms for the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of California have gone into effect recently.

Effective March 1, 2015, all motions for relief from the automatic stay in the Southern District that are filed to foreclose upon a security interest, or to pursue unlawful detainer actions, must substantially conform to Local Bankruptcy Forms CSD 1160 and CSD 1163. Additionally, the Southern District adopted amended its Local Bankruptcy Rules (also effective March 1, 2015), which can be viewed at the following link: http://www.casb.uscourts.gov/pdf/announcements/GLLBRAPCombined.pdf.

A more detailed discussion regarding the changes to Local Bankruptcy Forms CSD 1160 and CSD 1163, as well as the relevant amendments to the LBR, is set forth below:

1. Amendments to Local Bankruptcy Forms CSD 1160 and CSD 1163: Motions for Relief from the Automatic Stay and Unlawful Detainer

Beginning March 1, 2015, all Southern District motions for relief from the automatic stay (MFR) to foreclose upon a security interest or for unlawful detainer (UD) actions will be prepared by this author’s firm on revised Local Forms CSD 1160 or CSD 1163. As a result, any forms currently in use for Southern District MFR should be updated to conform to these new local forms. The revisions to the MFR forms are limited and mostly non-substantive. Aside from some subtle stylistic changes to the amended MFR and UD MFR forms, references to subsections (4), (5), and (6) of LBR 4001-2(a) have been replaced by a broader, more general reference to LBR 4001-2(a), which governs all of the required content in a MFR, including the requirement to provide a post-petition accounting of payments in a chapter 11 or 13 case, provide admissible evidence of value where relevant, and admissible evidence of the specific facts that constitute cause for relief. From a practical standpoint, this revision will not alter the requirement to provide the specific information required by the subsections of LBR 4001-2(a), and essentially only changes the appearance and format of Local Forms CSD 1160 and CSD 1163.

2. Amendments to Local Bankruptcy Rules

In light of the lengthy amendments to the Southern District Local Bankruptcy Rules, only those amendments deemed the most relevant are detailed here. More specifically, Local Bankruptcy Rules 3002-1, 3002-2, and 9018-1 are discussed below. Although not addressed here, please note that significant amendments were made to LBR 9013, which sets forth the rules for motion practice and contested matters in the Southern District, including notice and hearing requirements.

a. LBR 3002-1: Notices for Chapter 13 Cases Where No Proof of Claim Has Been Filed by the Creditor Holding a Claim Against the Debtor’s Principal Residence

LBR 3002-1 provides that a creditor holding a claim secured by a chapter 13 debtor’s principal residence may electronically file mandatory notices of mortgage payment change and notices of post-petition mortgage fees, expenses, and charges on the court’s claims register, pursuant to Federal Rule of Bankruptcy Procedure (FRBP) 3002.1(b) and (c), regardless of whether the creditor previously filed a proof of claim in the case. Accordingly, creditors who have yet to file their proof of claim, or previously elected to refrain from filing a proof of claim in a chapter 13 case, must still file any required payment change notices on the claims register in order to comply with the requirements of the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure.

b. LBR 3002-2: Objection to Notice of Payment Change

LBR 3002-2 sets forth the requirements for objecting to a creditor’s notice of mortgage payment change filed pursuant to FRBP 3002.1(b). Specifically, LBR 3002-2 requires a debtor objecting to a notice of mortgage payment change to obtain a hearing and file/serve an objection with Local Form CSD 1184 (Request and Notice of Hearing) on the creditor, chapter 13 trustee, and U.S. Trustee with at least 21 days’ notice to the creditor. The rule further provides that the creditor’s response to the objection must be filed within 14 days after service of the objection. As a result, creditors should be vigilant in reviewing and responding to any objections to payment change notices, and to also attend any scheduled hearings on the same. Finally, if debtors dispute any payment change notices in the context of a pending motion for relief from the automatic stay, creditors should raise the lack of any prior objection to the payment change notices in reply to the same.

c. LBR 9018-1: Documents Containing Personal Identifiers

LBR 9018-1 provides that all requests to restrict public access to documents, including proofs of claim and attachments, containing any of the personal identifiers enumerated in FRBP 9037(a) must be made by motion to restrict (redact) the document. The rule further provides that the party bringing the motion must file the amended document with the redacted information concurrently with the motion to restrict access. A hearing will not be required, as the amended rule specifically delegates the entry of an order on a motion to restrict to the clerk of the court as an administrative function. Accordingly, LBR 9018-1 allows creditors to streamline the process for restricting and redacting documents containing personally identifiable information without the necessity for a hearing or entry of an order by the bankruptcy judge assigned to the case. As a result, creditors and their counsel should take advantage of, and comply with, this expedited procedure when filing motions to restrict.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
March e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

U.S. Supreme Court Clarifies TILA Rescission Claims

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by Jessica L. Blanner
and Brian H. Liebo
Usset, Weingarden & Liebo, PLLP – USFN Member (Minnesota)

For many years, it has been the practice within the Eighth Circuit (comprised of Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota) that when a mortgage company was notified by a borrower that the borrower intended to rescind his mortgage, the borrower had to not only notice his intent within three years of the loan closing, but actually commence a lawsuit within the three-year time frame. Failure to do both actions within three years was tantamount to a waiver of the right to rescind, according to district court judges.

A recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court has definitively established the law on this matter for all jurisdictions across the nation. The Supreme Court reversed the judgment of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, and held that a borrower exercising his or her right to rescind a mortgage transaction under the Truth in Lending Act [hereinafter, TILA; see 15 U.S.C. § 1635(a), (f)] must only provide written notice to the lender within the three-year period, and need not commence an actual lawsuit within that three-year period. Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 574 U.S. __ (2015).

This action originated in Minnesota, after the borrowers refinanced their home by borrowing $611,000 from Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. on February 23, 2007. Exactly three years later, on February 23, 2010, the borrowers mailed a letter of rescission to the lender, alleging TILA violations. The lender denied the rescission request, and the borrowers filed suit on February 24, 2011. The borrowers argued that their TILA claims were timely because they sent a notice of rescission on February 23, 2010.

The U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota rejected the borrowers’ arguments and granted the lenders’ motion for judgment on the pleadings, holding that a suit for rescission filed more than three years after the loan’s consummation is time-barred, even if the borrowers mailed a notice of rescission within the three years. Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 2012 WL 1365751, *3 (D. Minn., Apr. 19, 2012). The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the district court’s judgment on the pleadings in favor of the lenders. Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 729 F. 3d 1092 (8th Cir. 2013).

In a unanimous opinion in Jesinoski, written by Justice Scalia, the U.S. Supreme Court reasoned that while Section 1635(f) “tells us when the right to rescind must be exercised, it says nothing about how that right is exercised.” The Supreme Court also explained that Section 1635(a) does not explicitly provide that a lawsuit is required for a rescission. In conclusion, the Supreme Court held that a borrower only needs to provide written notice to a lender in order to exercise the right to rescind within the three-year time frame. The Supreme Court’s decision settles a circuit split on this issue.

While the final Jesinoski decision appears borrower-friendly, the ruling is narrow in that it solely addresses a timing issue. Mailing a notice of rescission within three years of consummating a loan is sufficient to exercise the right to rescind, and a party seeking to rescind is not required to actually file a lawsuit within that three-year time period in order to preserve a rescission claim.

As a practice pointer, mortgage servicers are advised to carefully monitor all borrower correspondence for timely rescission claims and properly attend to such notices, even if the borrowers have not yet filed lawsuits to enforce mortgage rescission rights.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

U.S. Supreme Court Allows for Written Notice to Rescind a Loan

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by T. Matthew Mashburn
Aldridge Connors, LLP – USFN Member (Georgia)

On January 13, 2015, in a unanimous opinion that will no doubt require some significant clarification, the U.S. Supreme Court held that where the lender fails to satisfy the Truth in Lending Act’s disclosure requirements, a consumer may rescind the loan within three years of the consummation of the loan by simple written notice, rather than filing a lawsuit and having a court declare the loan rescinded. Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 574 U.S. __ (2015).

The potential confusion rests on the Supreme Court’s ruling that a loan can be rescinded without a pre-rescission tender of the loan payoff, but doesn’t mention that the result of the rescission is that the principal amount of the loan still has to be paid off.

By way of background, the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) gives the borrower (actually anyone who pledges a security interest in a principal place of residence for a non-exempt consumer loan) an absolute and unrestricted right to rescind the loan within three days of consummation by providing written notice to the lender. In addition, should the lender fail to provide certain disclosures required under TILA, the borrower has up to three years to rescind the loan.

At common law, rescission “traditionally required either that the rescinding party return what he received before a rescission could be effected (rescission at law), or else that a court affirmatively decree rescission (rescission in equity).” Id., citing 2 D. Dobbs, Law of Remedies § 9.3(3), pp. 585-586 (2d ed. 1993) [emphasis added].

The twist on the Jesinoski decision (and the part which could clog the courts with needless lawsuits until it is clarified) is that the Supreme Court failed to make it clear that the principal amount of the loan must still be repaid after the rescission. The rescission takes place by simple written notice based on Jesinoski, it is true; but, due to the rescission, the loan principal must be repaid after the rescission.

Indeed, courts have wrestled with the nature of the exact amount that must be paid back due to a rescission. This is especially true where the borrower finances the finance charges and lender fees, but no court has held that the entire principal balance is forgiven.

For example, in Moore v. Cycon Enterprises, Inc., 2007 WL 475202 (W.D. Mich., Feb. 9, 2007), the trial court ruled that a husband and wife, who rescinded a loan, were not required to repay lender fees and finance charges that were included in the principal. The lender contended that only finance charges were impacted by the borrower’s rescission. However, the court noted that TILA’s plain language states, “When an obligor exercises his right to rescind under subsection (a), he is not liable for any finance or other charge. …” 15 U.S.C. § 1635(b) [emphasis added]. The court ruled that the borrowers were not required to repay any of these fees and charges, which amounted to $25,237.85 out of the total $215,500 loan, but that the borrowers did have to repay the remainder of the principal balance.

Furthermore, prepayment penalties would seem to be at particular risk from the Jesinoski decision. Also, an imminent operational difficulty seems to be presented: how do lenders make sure that a responsible person or department actually receives the notice of rescission, so that the lender can call off a foreclosure, or other collection efforts, when warranted? Lenders will most likely have to include a notice in their billing (or other communications with borrowers), advising that any rescission has to be sent to a specific address. The lender will want to have a specific person or department assigned to receive and process rescissions, and make a determination as to whether the rescission was proper or not. Of course, any collection efforts will probably have to be suspended while the lender investigates whether there was a failure to satisfy TILA’s disclosure requirements.

Another dilemma will be in the case of assignments where the original lender has long since sold the loan and, thus, does not know (or cannot reasonably determine) whether there was a disclosure error in the first place.

The limitation on Jesinoski is that the Supreme Court’s holding only applies when the disclosures were defective at loan closing. Secondly, any loan that is over three years old is not impacted. However — and it’s a BIG however — it can be anticipated that every pro se with news of this judicial decision will attempt to rescind, regardless of having actual grounds to do so.

Accordingly, the immediate response of lenders to Jesinoski should be to make sure that a notice address is included in every communication to all persons with a right to rescind a loan, and to assign a specific person or department to respond to notices of rescission. The second step will be to set up a vetting system to determine whether or not the rescission is a legitimate one.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Rhode Island: Mediation Update

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by Joseph A. Camillo
Shechtman Halperin Savage, LLP – USFN Member (Rhode Island)

As you may be aware, Rhode Island enacted mediation legislation superseding several local ordinances. On July 8, 2014, the governor signed legislation amending the statute to clarify that process. It took effect on October 6, 2014, and any mediation notices that are not sent within 120 days of the default date are subject to penalties at a rate of $1,000 per month. These penalties are assessed to the servicer/mortgagee and must be paid in order to obtain a Certificate Authorizing Foreclosure.

On January 6, 2015, Rhode Island Housing held an open conference call to answer additional questions about the mediation process, and circulated a PowerPoint presentation. In that presentation, it was advised that mortgagees must pay any penalty or fees for loans with default dates of June 10, 2014 or earlier, by February 28, 2015; or the servicer will have to send new mediation notices and pay the penalty for additional days. This applies just to loans for which an invoice has already been sent to the mortgagee for penalties. Invoices are generated by Rhode Island Housing only after it has received a copy of the notice of mediation containing the default date, from which it determines the penalty to be paid.

Going forward, all penalties need to be paid within 90 days from the date Rhode Island Housing sends out the first invoice. If payment of penalties is not received from the servicer, no certificate will be issued, and a new mediation notice will be required. This will result in additional penalties accruing up to the date of the new notice.

Additionally, Certificates Authorizing Foreclosure are sent by Rhode Island Housing to the single point of contact provided on the notice. Should these certificates be lost, a duplicate certificate is needed, at a cost of $25. These certificates may only be requested by mail, and the $25 check must be included in order to obtain a certificate.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Massachusetts: Supreme Judicial Court Rules that Municipal Foreclosure Ordinances are Preempted by State Law

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by Katerina A. Pestova
Harmon Law Offices, PC – USFN Member (Massachusetts, New Hampshire)

On December 19, 2014, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) ruled on two critical questions regarding a pair of foreclosure ordinances passed by the City of Springfield. The SJC concluded in Easthampton Savings Bank v. City of Springfield (470 Mass. 284) that the ordinances were preempted by state law.

The case concerned two ordinances enacted by Springfield in 2011. The first ordinance regulated the maintenance of vacant properties, as well as properties undergoing foreclosure. The ordinance required lenders to register these properties and pay a $10,000 bond, which would be used by the city to maintain foreclosed properties if the bank failed to do so. The second ordinance required mortgagees that were attempting to foreclose on owner-occupied residential properties to participate in a city-approved pre-foreclosure mediation program.

Six local banks challenged the ordinances in state court; the city removed the case to federal court. Following the banks’ appeal from a District Court ruling in favor of the city, the First Circuit Court of Appeals asked the SJC to decide whether the local foreclosure laws were preempted by state laws, and whether the bond requirement constituted an illegal tax.

The SJC ruled that Springfield’s property registration ordinance was preempted to the extent that it conflicts with state laws. The court cited the ordinance’s surety bond and hazardous materials disclosure requirement as being in conflict with the state sanitary code, and the Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention Act, respectively. Regarding the mandatory mediation requirement, the court concluded that the ordinance as a whole conflicted with Massachusetts foreclosure statutes.

The federal case, which prompted the SJC’s ruling, has since been dismissed on technical grounds. The dismissal means that there is no formal order directly invalidating the city’s ordinances. However, in light of the SJC’s ruling, Springfield will likely amend its property registration ordinance. It is expected that the city will substitute a flat annual registration fee in place of the surety bond component, bringing Springfield in line with approximately 20 other municipalities that also have property registration ordinances with annual fees.

Four cities have ordinances substantially similar to Springfield’s, although only two of these cities have sought to enforce any portion of the ordinances. The Essex County Registry of Deeds has refused to record foreclosure deeds without a certificate of mediation from the City of Lynn, which remains a defendant in a federal lawsuit challenging its ordinances. The ruling in Easthampton Savings may also prompt local lawmakers to turn to the state legislature to implement mandatory mediation.

However, the Easthampton Savings ruling is critical for lenders because it halts — at least for the moment — the proliferation of differing pre-foreclosure requirements at the municipal level in Massachusetts.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Maryland: Do NOIs have a “Sell-by” Date?

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by Ronald S. Deutsch
Cohn, Goldberg & Deutsch, LLC – USFN Member (Washington, D.C.)

What is the difference between a loaf of bread with a sell-by date and a notice of intent to foreclose (NOI)? Answer: A loaf of bread has a definite sell-by date, while an NOI (a pre-foreclosure letter required by statute) has a potentially alternative smell test that it must pass. In a recent ruling, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals was presented with the issue of NOI staleness. [Granados v. Nadel, (Md. Ct. Spec. App. Dec. 16, 2014)].

Background: Maryland Law RP Section 7-105.1 provides that a foreclosure action generally may not be filed against a residential property until 45 days after the lender sends the borrower a notice of intent to foreclose. The purpose of this legislation is to aid borrowers in communicating with lenders in order to avoid foreclosure. In that vein, a notice is required to state the names and telephone numbers of the secured party, the loan servicer, and an agent of the secured party who is authorized to modify the terms of the mortgage loan.

The pertinent facts of the case: In 2009, the borrower defaulted on a loan secured by his principal residence. After making several late payments, a notice of intent to foreclose was sent on March 10, 2010, and a foreclosure case was thereafter commenced. Shortly after the foreclosure action was filed, the lender dismissed it without prejudice. Subsequently, the loan was transferred and a new servicer assumed responsibility for servicing the loan. The default was never cured. Almost a year later (on February 24, 2011), a second foreclosure action was filed.

In advancing the second foreclosure action, the foreclosing attorney relied on the original NOI that had been filed prior to the first foreclosure action. Further complicating the facts, the statute governing the notice requirement for residential foreclosures changed between the first foreclosure filing and the second one. The Maryland Commissioner of Financial Regulation, however, promulgated an advisory that foreclosing attorneys could rely on NOIs filed prior to July 1, 2010, without re-filing a new document.

The foreclosure attorneys asserted that the foreclosure was docketed using an NOI that complied with the law at the time that the NOI was issued. They maintained that the circuit court should read the new statutory provisions prospectively, permitting NOIs issued before the new law went into effect to serve as sufficient notice prior to filing an order to docket foreclosure. Finally, they contended that because the borrower did not cure his default, the original NOI remained valid.

In its ruling, the Court of Special Appeals noted that the borrower, in entering a HAMP workout after the first NOI, also received a form that advised that no new “notice of default, notice of intent to accelerate, notice of acceleration, or similar notice will be necessary to continue the foreclosure action; all rights to such notices being hereby waived to the extent permitted by applicable law.” Further, the court noted the commissioner’s advisory. Nevertheless, the court determined that the NOI was stale, finding that there is no perpetual validity to NOIs. Once the trustees dismissed the first foreclosure action, the lender was obligated to send the borrower a new NOI containing the particularized information and documents prescribed by law, before filing the second foreclosure action. Notably, the court declined to set an explicit expiration date.

Consequently, where a lender institutes a foreclosure and then dismisses it, a new NOI should be utilized on any subsequent filing. This is true, especially where the dismissal of the first foreclosure action coincided with legislative changes providing new protections to borrowers. The court stated that an NOI is not a blank check that will allow a lender to initiate a foreclosure proceeding against a borrower at any point in the future. The NOI has a specific function to give borrowers notice of a potential foreclosure and allow them to pursue remediation of their default. It would be contrary to the spirit of the law for the NOI to operate as a document providing notice to a borrower of an impending foreclosure by an uncertain lender at some unpredictable time in the future. In short, an old, potentially stale and incorrect NOI flouts the requirement of giving borrowers an opportunity to avoid foreclosure. Accordingly, such an NOI should not be relied upon by lenders seeking to foreclose in Maryland.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Connecticut: Appellate Court Affirms Standing of Holder of Note Endorsed in Blank

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by William R. Dziedzic
Bendett & McHugh, P.C. – USFN Member (Connecticut, Maine, Vermont)


The Connecticut Appellate Court recently affirmed a trial court’s entry of judgment of strict foreclosure. The decision is noteworthy because, in the appeal, the defendant challenged the trial court’s jurisdiction to enter judgment, claiming that the plaintiff was not the actual owner or holder of the note and, therefore, lacked standing. [BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP v. Farina, 154 Conn. App. 265 (2014)].

When confronted with this type of jurisdictional challenge previously, Connecticut’s Supreme Court and Appellate Court relied on a rebuttable presumption that the holder of a promissory note, endorsed in blank, is presumed to be the owner of the note. This rebuttable presumption of ownership complicated the analysis of standing when a plaintiff in a foreclosure case relied only on being a holder of the note as evidence of its authority to collect the debt and, thus, its evidence of standing.

In Farina, the Appellate Court was able to dispose of the challenge to the plaintiff’s standing by finding that the “plaintiff’s possession of the note endorsed in blank was sufficient to establish standing.” The court held that, “[B]ecause the plaintiff possessed the note, endorsed in blank, it was entitled to enforce the note.” There was no reference to a rebuttable presumption of ownership, only that the plaintiff, as holder of the note, was entitled to enforce the note.

From a practitioner’s point of view, this divergence from the rebuttable presumption of ownership analysis may shed light on the Appellate Court’s interpretation of the law of standing in a foreclosure case. It may also indicate how the Appellate Court will rule in the future when a loan servicer’s standing is challenged because it is servicing a loan on behalf of an investor, relying on its status as a holder of the note as its evidence of standing, and not on any allegation of ownership.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Massachusetts: Changes Affecting Credit Union Branching

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by Patricia Antonelli
and Robert M. Tammero, Jr.
Partridge Snow & Hahn LLP – USFN Member (Massachusetts)

On January 7, 2015, former Governor Patrick signed legislation permitting Massachusetts credit unions to establish branches in the other five New England states and New York, subject to certain limitations and requirements. As of December 31, 2014, there were 76 Massachusetts credit unions.

The legislation, known as “An Act Relative to Credit Union Branching” (Act), amends Chapter 171 of the Massachusetts General Laws to authorize Massachusetts credit unions to establish one or more branches in these states, provided that the branch is located within 100 miles of the credit union’s main office in Massachusetts, and subject to the prior approval of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks. Under the Act, credit unions are limited to one out-of-state branch application to the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks in any 12-month period.

Under current law and policy of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks, branches of a Massachusetts credit union must be located either in the county where the credit union’s main office is located, or within 50 miles of the credit union’s main office in a city or town in another county in Massachusetts.

The Act also contains provisions granting a credit union, having a principal place of business in one of the other five New England States (or New York), the right to establish branches in Massachusetts, if the laws under which the credit union was organized permit it, and the laws of the other state grant reciprocal rights to Massachusetts credit unions. The prior approval of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks is also required.

Rhode Island law, for example, contains a similar provision. It permits a credit union chartered in another state to do business in Rhode Island if: in the determination of the Director of the Rhode Island Department of Business Regulation, the laws of the other state provide reciprocal rights to Rhode Island credit unions.

These changes in Massachusetts law take effect on October 1, 2015. The Act requires the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks to promulgate rules and regulations implementing the Act by July 1, 2015.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Mississippi: Mobile Home Title

Posted By USFN, Friday, February 6, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 6, 2015 

 

by Bradley P. Jones
Wilson Adams & Edens – USFN Member (Mississippi)

Until July 1, 1999, Mississippi law did not mandate that mobile homes be titled. That changed with the passage of MCA § 63-21-9 (1972), as amended, which requires that mobile homes manufactured or assembled after July 1, 1999 (or which are the subject of first sale for use after July 1, 1999) be titled. Under this statute, a certificate of title (COT) is to be issued for mobile homes just as though they were any other motor vehicle.

Although, prior to July 1999, Mississippi did not require certificates of titles for mobile homes, certificates were often issued on those manufactured outside the state. Prior to the passage of MCA § 63-21-9, a second statute, MCA § 63-21-30 (1972), as amended (and which was not abrogated by the passage of MCA § 63-21-9) provided for the “cancellation” or “retirement” of the certificate of title; provided, of course, the mobile home has been classified as real property under MCA § 27-53-15. The former practice being: where a mobile home was permanently affixed to the property and certified as real property, it was considered part and parcel of the real property, and ownership could be transferred by deed alone.

The Mississippi statute pertaining to the certification of mobile homes as “real property” (MCA § 27-53-15 (1972)), contains wording that significantly “muddied the water” as to exactly what actions would be required for a lender to perfect a security interest in a permanently attached mobile home. Specifically, § 27-53-15 states that “[r]egardless of whether a manufactured or mobile home for which a certificate of title was required or issued pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 21, Title 63, Mississippi Code of 1972, is classified as real property or is classified as personal property, the perfection of a security interest therein shall be governed by the provisions of Chapter 21, Title 63, Mississippi Code of 1972).”

In a nutshell, a fair reading of § 63-21-30 and § 27-53-15 establishes that, with regard to mobile homes made or sold after July 1, 1999, the perfection of a security interest is to be accomplished under Mississippi’s motor vehicles laws. Thus, a COT with the lender/lienholder listed on the face of the certificate is the proper method of perfecting a security interest in such a mobile home. This, however, appears to be in direct contradiction to the Mississippi Department of Revenue’s longstanding reading and interpretation of § 63-21-30, in that once the title is submitted for retirement or cancellation, that department would purge the mobile home from its system, and would then treat the mobile home as real property rather than personal property.

As a result of the confusion and impasse that arose over the facially apparent conflict with the referenced statute, a number of foreclosure firms and HUD representatives met with the Department of Revenue in 2008. They sought the development of a consistent and uniform process for ensuring that servicers, following foreclosure, could obtain clear and marketable title to the land and permanently-attached mobile home. The agreed-upon procedure involves the post-foreclosure filing of a complaint naming the former borrowers, the Mississippi Department of Revenue, and any and all interested parties as defendants, seeking a judgment requiring the Mississippi Department of Revenue to issue a new certificate of title in the name of the foreclosing entity.

Such a lawsuit would not be required in a situation where an original COT has actually been issued, where the foreclosing entity is listed as lienholder on the title, and the original or replacement title is available. Under these circumstances (following the foreclosure), submission of the appropriate documentation (i.e., the original title or an application for replacement title signed by power of attorney, the necessary assignment of lien document, the affidavit of repossessed mobile home, substituted trustee’s deed, etc.) to the Mississippi Department of Revenue will result in the issuance of a COT in the name of the foreclosing entity.

On the other hand, a post-foreclosure mobile home lawsuit will need to be filed post-sale in the following instances: (1) where there was no original title issued; (2) where a COT was issued, but the lienholder listed thereon is one other than the current holder of the note and deed of trust, and where the current holder does not have possession of, and/or cannot obtain, an assignment of lien from the entity listed on the COT; and (3) where the mobile home has never been certified as real property.

Such post-foreclosure mobile home actions have become routine and commonplace in Mississippi, with chancery courts regularly entering judgment throughout the state. The only negatives are the additional costs to servicers for attorneys’ fees and costs, as well as the further time added to the standard foreclosure timeline.

Unfortunately, a sizeable setback occurred in 2012, when the court refused to enter a default judgment in a routine post-foreclosure mobile home action because the mobile home in question was not described in the foreclosed deed of trust. The servicer appealed the chancery court’s ruling to the Mississippi Court of Appeals. See Deutsche Bank National Trust Company v. Brechtel, 81 So. 3d 277 (Miss. Ct. App. 2012). While the appeal was ultimately dismissed for lack of jurisdiction (and, therefore, had no precedential effect on the merits), the case was widely discussed among the state’s judiciary. The chancery court ruling has had the practical effect of establishing the need for pre-foreclosure reformation action, where the mobile home is not described or referenced in the underlying deed of trust.

Mobile home lien perfection issues can easily be addressed at loan origination. Unfortunately, if the issues are not properly addressed then, servicers will continue to experience difficulty in handling mobile home foreclosures in Mississippi. Under certain circumstances, it is extremely foreseeable that both pre-foreclosure and post-foreclosure mobile home judicial actions will be required.

©Copyright 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
February e-Update

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Foreclosure Law: Uniformity in Our Future?

Posted By USFN, Thursday, February 5, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 5, 2015 

 

by Michael L. Zevitz
South & Associates, P.C.
USFN Member (Kansas, Missouri)
and Wendy Walter
RCO Legal, P.S.
USFN Member (Arkansas, Oregon, Washington)

You may not be familiar with the Uniform Law Commission (ULC, also known as the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws), but you’ve probably had exposure to some of the laws it has helped to promulgate. For instance, there have been many uniform laws that have contributed substantially to the real estate industry over the years: the Uniform Commercial Code, the Consumer Credit Code, the Electronic Transactions Act, the Real Property Electronic Recording Act, the Rules of Evidence … and the list goes on. The ULC, now in its 123rd year, comprises more than 350 practicing lawyers, governmental lawyers, judges, law professors, and lawyer-legislators who have been appointed by state governments to research, draft, and promote enactment of uniform laws in areas of state law where uniformity is desirable and practical.

Pending before the ULC is the Home Foreclosure Procedures Act (HFPA or the Act). In 2012, just a few years after the outbreak of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, the ULC drafting committee embarked on a journey to bring some uniformity to the vagaries and variances that abound in foreclosure procedures across the county. The kick-off meeting welcomed 55 stakeholders representing 40 different organizations. Some of the attendees included FHFA, American Bankers Association, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, MERS, MBA, and the Federal Reserve Board. The ULC commission has gone to great lengths to involve as many stakeholders as possible, including those representing borrowers and consumer credit organizations.

Recognizing that the nationwide split between judicial and nonjudicial foreclosure is roughly 50-50, the ULC seeks to provide uniformity in select practices and procedures that have commonality in residential mortgage foreclosure actions. Realizing that foreclosure actions are governed by the law in the state in which the property is located, one of the high priorities of the ULC is to achieve “enactability.” In other words, there must be a reasonable probability that the Act (when approved) either will be accepted and enacted into law by a substantial number of states or, if not, will promote uniformity indirectly. It should be pointed out that the scope of the proposed act, as a policy matter, would continue as an overlay to existing state foreclosure laws and not as a replacement to those existing laws. As a consequence, unless expressly repealed or changed, states may continue judicial foreclosure, nonjudicial foreclosure, or a combination of the two.

The HFPA attempts to strike a balance between providing a foreclosure remedy that is undertaken with due care for homeowners and setting up a solid procedural guidepost for the mortgage servicer, bringing clarity and consistency to the forefront of the many hotbed issues that have been raised in the last several years. This article will give a brief summary of the more poignant sections of the model act, as of the latest draft of the Act that is dated November 2014.

Article 2 – Notice of Default and Right to Cure
This section would require a creditor to send, to an obligor, a notice of default and right to cure 30 days before initiating a foreclosure process. The contents of the notice closely mimic the Acceleration and Remedies paragraph found in the standard Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac Uniform Instrument. The notice can be sent by first-class mail, containing an “itemization of the amount due” as of the date of the notice. The notice must also contain a statement as to the creditor’s right to foreclose (proof of legal standing) and the name of the legal owner of the obligation, if the creditor is not the legal owner of the note and security instrument. The mortgage obligation may be accelerated by filing a complaint, scheduling a sale, or by separate notice of acceleration. The notice of intent to foreclose does not, by itself, accelerate the debt.

Article 3– Early Resolution
Yesterday’s mediation has become today’s “Early Resolution.” In the wake of the 2008 foreclosure crisis, 18 states have installed mediation programs aimed at preventing foreclosures. The CFPB has adopted regulations that will require mortgage servicers to notify homeowners of foreclosure alternatives prior to foreclosure sales. The HFPA would establish a uniform structure for mediation programs, leaving many details to a court or agency rulemaking process, and deferring to the CFPB the rules as to servicer duties to notify homeowners about foreclosure alternatives, and handling homeowner loss mitigation applications appropriately. Ideally, the HFPA would encourage mediation to occur between the notice of default (Article 2) and the first legal notice or filing. The draft Act establishes a framework outlining the contents of the notice, eligibility for the program, and proscribes conduct during the meeting. The HFPA leaves broad latitude to the responsible state agency in designing the program. The Act provides additional guidance by appending 30 rules that would help govern the Early Resolution process.

Article 4– Right to Foreclose and Sale Procedures
To address later possible challenges to legal standing or real party in interest, the HFPA proposes that only a person entitled to enforce the obligation secured by the mortgage may commence foreclosure. Here’s a potential game changer: if the obligation is registered in a “Mortgage Registry,” the only person who may commence a foreclosure is the person designated as owner or holder of the obligation by the registry, as of the time that foreclosure is commenced. A national mortgage registry does not presently exist, but there is substantial interest in its creation. The foreshadowed Mortgage Registry would exist if a number of federal agencies (including the Federal Reserve, FHFA, and Treasury) creates a new federally-mandated system for the electronic recording and tracking of promissory notes, mortgages, and other related mortgage documents.

The “Notice of Public Sale” must be mailed to the property address at least 30 days prior to the sale. The creditor must publish a commercially reasonable public advertisement of the sale, either by publishing in a newspaper once per week for three consecutive weeks, not more than 30 days prior to sale; or by posting on an internet website that is reasonably expected to be viewed by persons having an interest in purchasing the property, at least 21 days before the sale. This is an acknowledgment that traditional printing methods may no longer be the best means of generating the highest and best bids in a public auction, and that there may be more effective technology solutions available (the internet being the most obvious). Furthermore, the full legal description would no longer be required in the Act, and the drafters highlight the fact that legal descriptions are seldom of importance to a person who reads a foreclosure advertisement with an eye toward purchasing the property. The Act requires the creditor to send a copy of the advertisement (or internet posting) to the homeowner and to each obligor, no later than the date of the first publication.

The Act provides for the postponement of the sale for “any reason;” however, the committee dropped the “good faith” qualifier on this postponement section. The sale date does not need to be republished, unless the rescheduled sale is more than 30 days after the date from which it is postponed. What is not clear is whether this relates back to the original sale date, or if it only looks back to the previous sale date and the gap in time between those two dates. Notice of the postponement must be given to the homeowner and obligor, but if they are present at the sale, an oral notice of the new date would suffice. If there is not a subsequent date given, the Act defines this as a “cancellation,” and a notice of the cancellation must be provided to the homeowner and obligor.

Article 5 - Negotiated Transfer
A homeowner and a creditor may negotiate a transfer of mortgaged property to the creditor in full satisfaction of the obligation to the creditor secured by the mortgaged property if the homeowner and creditor agree to the transfer in writing. This section authorizes a transfer from the homeowner to the creditor in full satisfaction of the debt. There is a due process element to give notice and an opportunity for hearing to junior lienholders as well as other types of creditors. In so doing, it provides a framework for existing workout arrangements such as cash-for-keys and deeds-in-lieu of foreclosure transactions. This section provides for a safe harbor by specifying the effect of a transfer that meets certain requirements. The important innovations here are, first: to provide an expedited procedure to discharge junior liens on the property without the need for a foreclosure sale; and, second: to resolve a number of collateral issues that flow from the expedited procedure.

Article 6– Abandoned Property
The Act also addresses vacant and abandoned properties by authorizing an expedited foreclosure procedure for both judicial and nonjudicial foreclosures. An expedited procedure addresses the social impact that defaults bring to society. By providing for an expedited foreclosure procedure, this section seeks to return abandoned properties to the stock of occupied, well-maintained housing as soon as reasonably possible. The Act defines “abandonment” and outlines procedures for determining whether property is abandoned in both the judicial and nonjudicial foreclosure settings, and it provides a process for withdrawing those proceedings as well. If property is determined abandoned, the judicial foreclosure procedure would allow the court to order the sale of the property no later than 30 days after the entry of the judgment of foreclosure. For a nonjudicial foreclosure, the process contemplates having a governmental agency make the determination on abandonment, and the Act provides that the sale of the abandoned property may occur within 30 days (but not later than 60 days) after the determination. The determination process will allow for expedited foreclosure, but imposes a duty on the creditor to maintain the abandoned property up until the foreclosure sale, or release of the mortgage or security interest.

Article 7 - Remedies
In a judicial foreclosure proceeding, if a creditor is shown to have committed a material violation of the Act, the court may dismiss the action, stay the action on appropriate terms and conditions, or impose other appropriate sanctions until the violation is cured. In a nonjudicial foreclosure proceeding, a homeowner may initiate an action to enjoin or restrain the foreclosure on the grounds that a creditor committed a material violation of this Act. If the court finds that a material violation occurred, the court shall nevertheless allow foreclosure to continue after the violation is cured, unless the court determines that continuation of the foreclosure action would unfairly burden the homeowner. If a material violation is established, the creditor may not add to the amount of the obligation any attorneys’ fees or costs incurred as a result of the violation, before it cures the violation. A homeowner injured by a violation may bring an action for actual damages. In addition to actual damages, a homeowner may recover statutory damages not exceeding $15,000 in the case of a pattern or practice of noncompliance.

Conclusion
At each committee meeting, the ULC is engaging in debates that are also occurring in many legislatures, courts, and mediation hearings taking place in this country every day. The ULC continues to refine the HFPA and has plans to meet again in February 2015 to further discuss and revise the Act. Naturally, writing the rules of the game while it is being played is no easy task.

USFN plans to follow up with another article in the Spring USFN Report, diving further into the contemplated Mortgage Registry, as well as to provide an update on the political dialogue about this concept. There is little argument that uniform state and federal laws would be enormously helpful to the mortgage markets; uniform and clear standards would reduce the costs of tracking and complying with myriad state laws and could reduce the cost of housing finance for consumers. This proposed Act may turn out to be the panacea that has been so elusive in the past.

Copyright © 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
Winter USFN Report

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

Legal Issues Update: FDCPA: Split among the Circuits as to the Validation of Debts and Disputes

Posted By USFN, Thursday, February 5, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 5, 2015 

 

by Holly Smith
South & Associates, P.C.
USFN Member (Kansas, Missouri)

This article appeared in the USFN e-Update (Sept. 2014 ed.) and is reprinted here for those readers who missed it.

There is a split of authority among the circuits as to whether or not a debtor must articulate a dispute in writing under the validation of debts section of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), specifically 15 USC 1692g(a)(3). This is certainly a topic for servicers to monitor because of the strict liability penalties imposed by the FDCPA.

15 USC 1692g states:


(a) Within five days after the initial communication with a consumer in connection with the collection of any debt, a debt collector shall, unless the following information is contained in the initial communication or the consumer has paid the debt, send the consumer a written notice containing —
 (1) the amount of the debt;
 (2) the name of the creditor to whom the debt is owed;
 (3) a statement that unless the consumer, within thirty days after receipt of the notice, disputes the validity of the debt, or any portion thereof, the debt will be assumed to be valid by the debt collector;
 (4) a statement that if the consumer notifies the debt collector in writing within the thirty-day period that the debt, or any portion thereof, is disputed, the debt collector will obtain verification of the debt or a copy of the judgment against the consumer and a copy of such verification or judgment will be mailed to the consumer by the debt collector; and
 (5) a statement that, upon the consumer’s written request within the thirty-day period, the debt collector will provide the consumer with the name and address of the original creditor, if different from the current creditor.

Third Circuit— In 1991, the Third Circuit (comprised of Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and the Virgin Islands) issued a decision that a consumer debtor must voice a dispute in writing that contests the validity of the debt, Graziano v. Harrison, 950 F.2d 107 (3d Cir. 1991). The Graziano opinion states: “that reading 1692g(a)(3) not to impose a writing requirement would result in an incoherent system in light of the explicit writing requirements stated in sections 1692g(a)(4)-(5) and 1692g(b).” Id. The court also concluded that written statements create a record of the dispute.

Ninth Circuit — Several years later, in 2005, the Ninth Circuit (comprised of Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Guam, and Northern Mariana Islands) issued an opinion regarding 15 USC 1692g(a)(3) that the dispute need not be expressed in writing. Camacho v. Bridgeport Financial, Inc., 430 F.3d 1078 (9th Cir. 2005). The court recited four main reasons in its decision: (1) there are explicit contrasting writing requirements in the statute; (2) the statute provides for other protections in an instance of dispute that only depend on a dispute, and not whether there was a prior writing; (3) the legislative purpose of allowing debtors to challenge the initial communication is furthered by permitting oral objections; and (4) from a reading of the statute, to conclude that some rights are triggered by oral disputes while others require a written statement, would not mislead consumers.

Second Circuit
— In May 2013, the Second Circuit (comprised of Connecticut, New York, and Vermont) decided a case, also based on 15 USC 1692g, with similar facts to the two cases referenced above. The Second Circuit decision agreed with the reasoning of the Ninth Circuit, holding that a dispute brought under 15 USC 1692g(a)(3) need not be in writing. Stating in relevant part, “the right to dispute a debt is the most fundamental of those set forth in 1692g(a) and it was reasonable to ensure that it could be exercised by consumer debtors who may have some difficulty with making a timely written challenge.” Hooks v. Forman, Holt, Eliades & Ravin, LLC, 717 F.3d 282 (2d Cir. 2013).

Conclusion

Consumer disputes are becoming increasingly common and although the cases cited here pertain to a very specific portion of the FDCPA, it is a part of the FDCPA that should never be ignored. Most importantly, because of the current split among the circuits, these decisions should be watched closely in all jurisdictions.

Copyright © 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
Winter USFN Report

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

HOA Talk: Florida: Post-Judgment Determination of Association Assessments

Posted By USFN, Thursday, February 5, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 5, 2015 

 

by Robert Schneider
Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
USFN Member (Florida)

Litigation between foreclosing lenders and condominium (and homeowners) associations over past-due assessments is nothing new in Florida. The methods by which lenders may seek recourse for improper assessments, however, have been clarified — and limited — by the recent Third District Court of Appeal decision in Central Mortgage Company v. Callahan, 2014 WL 3455485 (Fla. 3d DCA).

In Callahan, Central obtained final judgment of foreclosure, was the successful bidder at the foreclosure sale, and ultimately took title to the foreclosed property. Central’s final judgment included language stating that Central’s lien was superior to all other interests in the property, with the exception of condominium and homeowners association assessments (which are greatly limited by statute in Florida when the foreclosing lender takes title to the property through the foreclosure sale).

In a scenario that has become all too common in Florida, the associations that oversaw the subject property sought past-due assessments from Central for amounts much greater than what were owed to them. Central filed a post-judgment motion in its foreclosure case, seeking a judicial determination of the amounts due to the associations. The trial court denied the motion, based on a lack of jurisdiction, and Central appealed.

On appeal, Central contended that since the court had inherent jurisdiction to enforce the judgment, it necessarily had the authority to determine statutory assessments after the time had run to amend Central’s judgment. The appellate court disagreed. Because Central included in its judgment only a general reservation of jurisdiction to enforce writs of possession and deficiency judgments, and because the issue of past-due assessments had never been litigated or adjudicated, the court ruled that it was without power to determine Central’s motion.

The takeaway from Callahan, much like that of a similar reforeclosure opinion in Florida [Ross v. Wells Fargo Bank, 114 So. 3d 256 (Fla. 3d DCA 2013)], is that if post-judgment litigation is possible, the foreclosure judgment must specifically reserve jurisdiction over the anticipated type of litigation. The practical solution to the instant situation (and one which has been previously implemented by this author’s firm) is to include language in all final judgments of foreclosure reserving the right to determine the amounts owed to any condominium or homeowners association. Without the inclusion of the necessary reservation language in the final judgment, lenders may be forced to file separate suits to fight improper assessments, or be prepared to give in to the associations’ improper demands.

Copyright © 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
Winter USFN Report

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

HOA Talk: Missouri: Condo Lien Priority Law Changes

Posted By USFN, Thursday, February 5, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 5, 2015 

 

by Kara Elgin
and Clayton Volker
South & Associates, P.C
USFN Member (Kansas, Missouri)

During and after the foreclosure process, the issue of priority between home/condominium associations and deeds of trust arises frequently. Both a lien recorded prior to the deed of trust that is to be foreclosed, and a lien against a former owner, would take priority and need to be cleared from title.

Home association liens and assessments are not controlled by a Missouri statute, and thus, are governed by individual covenants and declarations. These liens and assessments typically, but not always, subordinate to a first lien or purchase-money deed of trust. Condominium association assessments are governed by Missouri statute.

In August 2014, Missouri enacted House Bill 1218, impacting the lien priority of condominium association liens in relation to deeds of trust under Mo. Rev. Stat. § 448.3-116.

Under the prior wording of Mo. Rev. Stat § 448.3-116.2, a purchase-money deed of trust (a deed of trust that was taken out for the purpose of purchasing a condominium, rather than a refinance mortgage) had priority and any pre-foreclosure assessments would be extinguished through foreclosure. This meant that the lender was liable for any assessments due after the foreclosure sale. Under the prior statute, the condo association could place liens, or even foreclose, on the condo nonjudicially — in like manner as a mortgage on real estate, or power of sale, pursuant to Mo. Rev. Stat. § 443 — and the deed of trust would be left intact with a priority position. Following a foreclosure sale on a purchase-money deed of trust, the new owner would only be subject to liens or assessments incurred after the foreclosure sale date.

While the above is still good law for purchase-money deeds of trust that were taken out and recorded prior to August 28, 2014, for those deeds of trust taken out after that date, the amended statute has added a new subsection that addresses priority of assessments over deeds of trust. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 448.3-116.2(3) states that, generally, condominium liens will be subordinate to any deed of trust, purchase-money or refinance, recorded prior to the date that a condominium assessment becomes due.

The remainder of subsection three discusses common expense assessments for a six-month period. An assessment tied specifically to a unit is subordinate to a deed of trust recorded prior to the date the assessment comes due, but the condominium association will be able to collect a portion of up to six months’ worth of common expense assessments. Section seven of the statute has been revised to allow for collection of costs and reasonable attorneys’ fees, incurred in connection with the collection of assessments.

As the amended statute is relatively new, the effect is not yet completely known, nor are the practical consequences of it. As such, this changing area of law will continue to be monitored.

Copyright © 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
Winter USFN Report

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

HOA Talk: Nevada: HOA Lien Priority?

Posted By USFN, Thursday, February 5, 2015
Updated: Wednesday, September 23, 2015

February 5, 2015 

 

by David W. Cowles
Tiffany & Bosco P.A.
USFN Member (Arizona, Nevada)

by: Laurel I. Handley
Pite Duncan, LLP
USFN Member (California, Nevada)

The priority and amount of a homeowners association (HOA) lien has been heavily contested in Nevada for the past several years. The current statute governing HOA lien priority and foreclosure was enacted in Nevada in 1991. The statute provides that an HOA lien has priority over a prior recorded first deed of trust, only “to the extent of the assessments for common expenses based on the periodic budget adopted by the association … which would have become due in the absence of acceleration during the 9 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the lien.” NRS § 116.3116(2).

Until recently, HOAs, lenders, title companies, and most courts interpreted the statute to mean that an HOA lien foreclosure did not extinguish a first priority deed of trust. As the value of homes in foreclosure declined and was no longer sufficient to pay all outstanding liens, HOAs, their collection agents, and investors began to assert that an HOA foreclosure sale extinguishes a first priority deed of trust.

SFR Investments Pool 1, LLC v. U.S. Bank
On September 18, 2014, the Nevada Supreme Court issued a significant decision interpreting the statute. In SFR Investments Pool 1, LLC v. U.S. Bank, N.A., 130 Nev. __, Advance Opinion 75 (Nev. 2014), the court held that a properly noticed nonjudicial (or judicial) foreclosure under an HOA’s super-priority lien under N.R.S.§ 116.3116(2) can extinguish a first priority deed of trust. Prior to this decision, the Nevada Supreme Court had not ruled on the issue, and the majority of Nevada courts had held that an HOA foreclosure did not extinguish a first deed of trust. Some courts had also held that an HOA must pursue judicial foreclosure in order to assert a super-priority lien.

The dispute in SFR Investments began when the homeowners became delinquent in their HOA assessment dues. Due to the delinquency, the HOA obtained a lien against the property and subsequently foreclosed, selling the property to SFR Investments Pool 1, LLC. Later, the beneficiary under a first priority deed of trust encumbering the property (U.S. Bank) attempted to foreclose on its deed of trust. Seeking to enjoin the sale, and contending that U.S. Bank’s deed of trust was extinguished by the HOA foreclosure sale, SFR filed a complaint seeking to quiet title. U.S. Bank filed a motion to dismiss, which the court granted, holding that an HOA’s super-priority lien must be foreclosed judicially. SFR appealed this decision to the Nevada Supreme Court. (Nevada does not have an intermediate appellate court.)

The Nevada Supreme Court ruled in favor of SFR, holding that an HOA lien has a “superpriority piece” that has true priority over other liens, including first priority deeds of trust recorded prior to the HOA lien. The Nevada Supreme Court also held that either nonjudicial or judicial foreclosure of the super-priority lien is sufficient to extinguish a first deed of trust and all other subordinate liens. In other words, judicial foreclosure by an HOA is not required to extinguish a first deed of trust.

The Nevada Supreme Court did not, however, reach issues as to the due process rights of a first deed of trust holder. At the “motion to dismiss” stage, the Nevada Supreme Court was constrained by the allegations in the complaint, which included allegations that U.S. Bank received sufficient notice of the HOA foreclosure. Similarly, the court could not consider the question as to whether U.S. Bank had attempted to tender funds to pay off the super-priority piece of the lien. Instead, the court merely commented that U.S. Bank could have determined the precise super-priority amount, or paid the entire lien and then sought a refund from the HOA.

Unfortunately, the court provided no specific instruction as to whether the super-priority piece of the lien is limited to nine months of monthly assessments, or whether it includes all charges associated with lien enforcement (as asserted by many HOAs). Thus, despite ruling that foreclosure of the super-priority lien terminates all other liens, calculation of the super-priority lien amount remains unclear. Moreover, the Nevada Supreme Court did not address whether the HOA foreclosure sale was conducted in a commercially reasonable manner, or whether U.S. Bank may have other defenses to challenge the validity of the foreclosure. These issues will need to be addressed by the parties on remand to the trial court.

Washington & Sandhill Homeowners Association v. Bank of America, N.A.
One week after SFR Investments was issued, the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada issued an order in Washington & Sandhill Homeowners Association v. Bank of America, N.A.; 2:13-cv-01845-GMN-GWF, Doc. No. 24. The district court held that the HOA foreclosure sale at issue did not extinguish the first deed of trust because it was insured by the FHA insurance program — and, thus, was protected by the U.S. Constitution’s Property and Supremacy Clauses. To date, this argument has not been extended to loans other than those insured by the FHA. It has, however, opened the door for other potential claims to challenge the authority of an HOA to extinguish a first priority deed of trust.

Since SFR Investments and Washington & Sandhill were issued, disputes have continued as to the amount of the super-priority piece of an HOA lien. Lenders, seeking to protect their secured interest in a property, have attempted to pay off the super-priority piece. However, obtaining a payoff amount is often difficult. For example, some HOAs have taken the position that only the total lien payoff can be provided because “the mechanism for [an HOA] foreclosure does not provide for a distinction in the amount of the lien which is recorded.” Moreover, when a super-priority payoff is provided, it invariably includes amounts for attorneys’ fees and collection costs, which lenders contend are not authorized by statute. Thus, while everyone has been instructed that an HOA super-priority lien can extinguish a first deed of trust, no one agrees as to how that super-priority lien is calculated (or how it can be paid off), so that an HOA foreclosure sale does not extinguish a first deed of trust.

What’s Next?
Fortunately, the Nevada Supreme Court is likely to provide guidance on these issues in the near future. On October 6, 2014, the court heard oral argument in a case involving a dispute over the amount of the super-priority piece of the lien. Shadow Wood Homeowner’s Association, Inc. v. New York Community Bancorp, Inc., Nev. Supreme Court Docket No. 63180. In addition, on November 13, 2014, the court accepted the following certified question from the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada:

What effect, if any, is there upon a foreclosure sale conducted pursuant to Nev. Rev. Stat. § 116.3116(2) when the association refuses to provide the holder of a first security interest under a deed of trust secured by the unit with the specific amount due under the portion of the association’s delinquent assessments lien that has been made prior to the deed of trust by Nev. Rev. Stat. § 116.3116(2)(c)?

GMAC Mortgage, LLC v. Nevada Association Services, Inc. Nev. Supreme Court Docket No. 65260.

Briefing with regard to this certified question has not yet been completed. However, the ultimate decision in these two cases, and in many others that are also pending, should assist both lenders and HOAs in determining not only the amount of the super-priority lien, but also the HOAs’ duties in advising lenders of the amount required to pay off the super-priority piece of the lien. This guidance is needed to ensure that everyone has a clear direction on the rules of law.

Copyright © 2015 USFN. All rights reserved.
Winter USFN Report

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 
Page 17 of 29
 |<   <<   <  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  >   >>   >| 
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal